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Voter Registration & Information

Be a Voter.

February 3

Last Day to Register to Vote

Feb. 18 - Feb. 28

Early Voting on the San Marcos Campus

March 3

Election Day


  Hey there, remember to bring a photo ID to vote! A driver's license will work but a student ID won't. Other valid forms of ID are listed here.

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  • Vote on the San Marcos Campus during Early Voting:

    February 18 – February 28 in the LBJ Student Center:

    • Tuesday, February 18 – Friday, February 21: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    • Saturday, February 22: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    • Sunday, February 23: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Monday, February 24 – Friday, February 28: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

    More City of San Marcos Early Voting options.

    Round Rock Campus (Williamson County) Early Voting options

  • Check the Texas Secretary of State website or use the tool below.

    Pro tip: If the tool shows that you are not or it cannot confirm that you are registered to vote, you should call the Election Office in the county where you think you are registered. The county elections office will have the most up to date information. For Hays County (San Marcos Campus), call 512.393.7310. For Williamson County (Round Rock Campus), call 512.943.1630.

  • Early Voting

    Tuesday, February 18 - Friday, February 28

    If you are a resident of Hays County, you may vote on the San Marcos Campus in the LBJ Student Center during early voting.

    • Tuesday, February 18 – Friday, February 21: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    • Saturday, February 22: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    • Sunday, February 23: 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Monday, February 24 – Friday, February 28: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

    Additional City of San Marcos and Hays County Early Voting polling location options.

    If you are a resident of Williamson County (Round Rock Campus), you may vote at any polling location within the county during early voting.

    Williamson County (Round Rock Campus) Early Voting polling location options.


    Election Day

    Tuesday, March 3

    If you are a resident of Hays County, you may vote on the San Marcos campus in the LBJ Student Center on Election Day (Tuesday, March 3, 2020) from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

    Residents of Hays County may vote at any polling place within Hays County.

    Additional City of San Marcos and Hays County Election Day polling place options.

    Find your precinct number on your voter registration card or by referencing this map.

    If you are a resident of Williamson County (Round Rock Campus), you may vote at any polling location within the county on Election Day.

    Williamson County (Round Rock Campus) Election Day Voting polling location options

  • What's a Precinct?

    Your apartment, residence hall, house, or whoever's couch you're crashing on is located in a specific “precinct”. Precincts are districts into which a county is divided for voting, and they mostly serve an administrative purpose.

    When you vote early, you do not have to worry about or know your precinct number because you can vote at any polling place in the county where you are registered. In Hays County, if you vote on Election Day, you may vote at any polling location within the county.

    What Precinct Am I Registered In?

    There are a few ways to find out:

     

  • Ask the poll worker for clarification

    First, ask for clarification about why you are turned away. Ensure in advance you are registered before the deadline, and are at the correct voting location as it will vary by precinct.

    If you do not have the correct ID

    If you did not bring approved identification with you to vote in person and do not have one of the supporting documents listed above to sign a "reasonable impediment declaration," ask to cast a provisional ballot at the polling location instead of a regular ballot.

    In order to have the provisional ballot counted in the election, you will need to visit the county voter registar's office by the sixth calendar day (Monday, March 9) after Election Day and show one of the seven acceptable forms of photo identification listed above.

    If you are still denied

    If you are still denied the right to vote, call the Election Protection Hotline 1.866.OUR.VOTE, or 1.888.VE.Y.VOTA for Spanish speakers, and they will help you with instructions. You may also report a possible voting rights abuse to the Secretary of State (1.800.252.8683) or to your local election official.

    Familiarize yourself with Texas' Voting Rights and be prepared to advocate for yourself!

  • Capital Area Rural Transportation System (CARTS) provides transportation for the San Marcos Campus community to and from polling places during early voting and on Election Day, November 5. For more information on rides to the polls, call CARTS at 512-478-7433 or visit www.RideCarts.com.

    Capital Metro provides service to and within Round Rock for the Round Rock Campus Community. For more information visit www.capmetro.org/roundrock/.

  • Hays County (San Marcos Campus)

    Verity Duo - How to Vote from Hart InterCivic on Vimeo.

    For more information and Verity Duo Intro and FAQs, visit the Hays County Election & Voting website

    Williamson County (Round Rock Campus)

    Visit the Williamson County Election Website for information on the ExpressVote Ballot Marking Device, DS200 Digital Scan Tabulator, and DS850 Central High Speed Digital Scanner and Tabulator.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • You are eligible to register to vote if:

    • You are a United States citizen;
    • You are a resident of the county where you submit the application;
    • You are at least 18 years old on Election Day;
    • You are not a convicted felon (you may be eligible to vote if you have completed your sentence, probation, and parole); and
    • You have not been declared by a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be either totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote.
  • Please note: The deadline to register to vote in Texas for the 2020 elections is February 3, 2020.

    Unfortunately, online voter registration is not offered in Texas.

    To register to vote: 

    Fill out the Register2Vote online application. They will then mail you a voter registration card pre-filled with your information and a prepaid addressed envelope. Simply sign the registration form and put it back in the mail. They will use USPS tracking to ensure that your registration arrives safely at your local county registrar.

    Fill out the application to receive your voter registration card ›


  • What's a Precinct?

    Your apartment, res hall, house, or whoever's couch you're crashing on is located in a specific “precinct”. Precincts are districts into which a county is divided for voting, and they mostly serve an administrative purpose.

    When you vote early, you don't have to worry about or know your precinct number because you can vote at any polling place in the county where you're registered. In Hays County, if you vote on Election Day, you may vote at any polling location within the county.

    What Precinct am I registered in?

    There are a few ways to find out:

  • Texas requires most voters to show Photo ID

    Note: a University student ID is NOT an accepted form of photo ID. However, the address on your ID does not have to match the address of your voter registration.

    The approved forms of photo IDs are:

    • Texas Driver's License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
    • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
    • Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS
    • Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
    • United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Passport (book or card)

    If you do not have an approved photo ID:

    Voters who are on the official list of registered voters and who do not have any form of approved photo ID may complete and sign a "reasonable impediment declaration" and vote with a regular ballot if they present one of the following:

    • any government document that shows the voter’s name and an address, including the voter’s voter registration certificate  (copy or original)
    • current utility bill (copy or original)
    • bank statement (copy or original)
    • government check  (copy or original)
    • original paycheck  (copy or original)
    • certified birth certificate (copy or original)
  • No.

    Student ID cards, even those that have a photo, are not approved as an acceptable form of photo ID for voting in Texas.  The acceptable forms of ID are:

    • Texas Driver License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
    • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
    • Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS
    • Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
    • United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Passport (book or card)

    The address on your ID does not have to match the address of your voter registration.


    Did you know?

    The Texas Legislature created the current voter ID laws during the 2017 legislative session. To find out more about this bill and how it became law, you can search for "Texas legislature voter ID law".

  • Ask the poll worker for clarification

    First, you can ask for clarification about why you are turned away. Ensure in advance you are registered before the deadline, and are at the correct voting location as it will vary by precinct.

    If you don't have the correct ID

    If you did not bring approved identification with you to vote in person and do not have one of the supporting documents listed above to sign a "reasonable impediment declaration," ask to cast a provisional ballot at the polling location instead of a regular ballot.

    In order to have the provisional ballot counted in the election, you will need to visit the county voter registar's office by the sixth calendar day after Election Day and show one of the seven acceptable forms of photo identification listed above.

    If you are still denied

    If you are still denied the right to vote, call the Election Protection Hotline 1.866.OUR.VOTE, or 1.888.VE.Y.VOTA for Spanish speakers, and they will help you with instructions. You may also report a possible voting rights abuse to the Secretary of State (1.800.252.8683) or to your local election official.

    Familiarize yourself with Texas' Voting Rights and be prepared to advocate for yourself!

  • No.

    The next best thing is to use Register2Vote. They will mail you a voter registration card pre-filled with your information and a prepaid addressed envelope. All you have to do is:

    1. sign the registration form and
    2. put it back in the mail

    They will use USPS tracking to ensure that your registration arrives safely at your local county registrar.

  • All info below is for absentee voting in Texas. If your home state is not Texas, check here for the absentee voting rules specific to your state.

    Get your absentee ballot here

     

    Absentee ballot application deadline:

    Received 11 days before Election Day.

    Voted ballots are due:

    Postmarked by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day and received by 5:00 p.m. the day after Election Day (by mail).

    Received by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day (in person).

    Absentee Ballot Rules

    You may vote by absentee ballot in Texas if:

    • you are 65 years or older;
    • you are disabled;
    • you will be out of the county on Election Day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance; or
    • you are confined in jail, but otherwise eligible.

    Once you get your absentee ballot in Texas:

    1. Once you receive the ballot, carefully read and follow the instructions.
    2. Sign and date where indicated.
    3. Mail your voted ballot back to the address indicated on the return envelope.
    4. Your voted ballot must arrive by the deadline or it will not be counted.
  • News Outlets

    Nonpartisan Organizations

    Government Resources

  • National & State

    To find out who represents you at the national and state level, use this form.

    If you live on campus and need the address of your residence hall, see our list of halls and addresses below under the "Voting in College" section.

    County

    To find out who represents you at the county level, check this chart on the Hays County (San Marcos Campus) website or this page on the Williamson County (Round Rock Campus) website.

    City

    In the City of San Marcos, every member of the City Council is an at-large representative (which means they do not have districts, they all represent everyone). Here is a list of the members of the San Marcos City Council.

    Here is a list of the members of the Round Rock City Council

  • Yes! Hays County offers online training for volunteer deputy registrars.

    Access the approved volunteer deputy registrar training material.

    When you feel adequately educated and prepared, visit the Elections Office (no appointment necessary from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.) to take the open-book exam and receive your certificate of appointment and supply packet.

    The Elections Office is in the Hays County Government Center and is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, at:

    712 South Stagecoach Trail
    Suite 1045
    San Marcos, TX  78666

    Call the Hays County Elections Administration office at (512) 393-7310 for more information.

    Yes! For Williamson County (Round Rock Campus), visit County Elections website for more information.

Does voting even matter?

Your vote matters because *every* vote makes a difference. In a democracy like America, it takes all of us to build the political system. Make sure that you’re registered to vote and know when the next election is (hint: it's March 3).

Representatives represent you

Elected representatives work for us, the people they represent. They get paid from part of our taxes, and they decide how to spend other parts of our taxes. Your votes on current issues give them the feedback they need to represent you and spend your money.

  •  

    Many university students aren’t required to pay taxes because of their income level. Or, because their hometown is different from where they go to school, they don’t feel as connected to local tax-dollar decisions.

    But even if you don’t pay taxes, you probably use services that local and state taxes pay for: things like public transit, affordable housing, roads, utility systems that keep your internet working and your water running, police departments and so on. Elected officials decide which of those services get money, and how much.

    Your vote tells them how you want that money to be spent.

  • Sometimes people feel like voting doesn’t matter because they live in a place where one political party tends to win elections every time. If you don’t support that dominant party, voting can feel pointless. But it’s not.

    Think of it this way: if you don’t vote, the dominant party sees only the votes of support, telling them to keep doing what they’re doing. If you do vote, the dominant party is less dominant — they get real evidence that people disagree with their actions. The feedback from your vote makes an impact.

  • It might feel like that, but they do.

    Elections affect nearly every part of life in one way or another. In fact, the local elections that sometimes feel less important actually have many of the most direct impacts on our lives.

    • How much money goes to education (and how much tuition costs)
    • Whether there are safe and affordable housing options in your city
    • Whether there is public transit that takes you where you need to go
    • How easy or hard it is to start your own business
    • Whether the roads you drive on are safe and efficient
    • How people who commit crimes are punished or rehabilitated
    • Fees and access to parks, roads and parking
    • What land is or isn't developed
    • …and much more.
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Voting in College
  • The choice is legally yours. You can register back home or at your Texas State address as long as you don't register to vote in both places. The address on your ID does not have to match the address of your voter registration.

    If you decide to register with your home address, you need to sign up for an absentee ballot. Make sure you allow yourself enough time to receive — and return — your ballot through the mail.

  • Be sure to include your Box # following your residence hall's street address. This is the number you were assigned at move in, and may not necessarily be your room number. The hall name is not needed.

    Example:

    Your Name
    951 Moore St., #123
    San Marcos, TX  78666
     

    Angelina

    951 Moore St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Arnold

    101 Russell Cir., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Beretta

    616 N. LBJ Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Bexar

    100 Llano, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Blanco

    701 Moore St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Bobcat Village

    1301 Aquarena Springs Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Brogdon

    607 N. Edward Gary, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Butler

    500 N. Edward Gary, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Chautauqua

    302 Student Center Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    College Inn

    714 N. Comanche St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Falls

    631 Moore St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Gaillardia

    302 Student Center Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Jackson

    702 Tomas Rivera, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Lantana

    501 N. Edward Gary, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Laurel

    600 N. LBJ Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Retama

    611 N. LBJ Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666

    San Gabriel

    951 Moore St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    San Jacinto

    217 W. Woods St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    San Marcos

    703 Academy St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Sayers

    631 Moore St., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Smith

    101 Russell Cir., San Marcos, TX 78666

    Sterry

    409 Edward Gary, San Marcos, TX 78666

    Tower

    101 W. Woods St., San Marcos, TX 78666

  • All info below is for absentee voting in Texas. If your home state is not Texas, check here for the absentee voting rules specific to your state.

    Get your absentee ballot here

     

    Absentee ballot application deadline:

    Received 11 days before Election Day.

    Voted ballots are due:

    Postmarked by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day and received by 5:00 p.m. the day after Election Day (by mail).

    Received by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day (in person).

    Absentee Ballot Rules

    You may vote by absentee ballot in Texas if:

    • you are 65 years or older;
    • you are disabled;
    • you will be out of the county on Election Day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance; or
    • you are confined in jail, but otherwise eligible.

    Once you get your absentee ballot in Texas:

    1. Once you receive the ballot, carefully read and follow the instructions.
    2. Sign and date where indicated.
    3. Mail your voted ballot back to the address indicated on the return envelope.
    4. Your voted ballot must arrive by the deadline or it will not be counted.
  • No.

    Student ID cards, even those that have a photo, are not approved as an acceptable form of photo ID for voting in Texas.  The acceptable forms of ID are:

    • Texas Driver's License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
    • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
    • Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS
    • Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
    • United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
    • United States Passport (book or card)

    The address on your ID does not have to match the address of your voter registration.


    Did you know?

    The Texas Legislature created the current voter ID laws during the 2017 legislative session. To find out more about this bill and how it became law, you can search for "Texas legislature voter ID law."

  • Capital Area Rural Transportation System (CARTS) provides transportation for the San Marcos Campus community to and from polling places during early voting and on Election Day, November 5. For more information on rides to the polls, call CARTS at 512-478-7433 or visit www.RideCarts.com.

    Capital Metro provides service to and within Round Rock for the Round Rock Campus Community. For more information visit www.capmetro.org/roundrock/.